Happiness v/s Sadness in Life

In Northern India, if someone laughs too much and is too happy, they say, “Don’t laugh so much. It will be followed by misery.” (Hasse Da Manasa) This is an unfortunate kind of wisdom some people have come to because life has been like that to them. If they experience too much joy today, misery will strike them tomorrow. This is because people work themselves up. In their minds, they multiply both misery and joy. Now you may ask, “If we don’t do this, where is the beauty in life?” Life is beautiful as it is. You do not have to give it a coat of make-up.

It is because you have no attention for life in its fundamental sense that you are lost in your psychological reality. The psychological and physiological aspects of who you are happen in cycles. You may be overly exuberant and on a high today and hit the bottom tomorrow. Most human beings are going through this psychological rollercoaster. You will always find some outside influence as an excuse, but even if we lock you up in a room and there is no one who can cause happiness or misery to you, still these psychological cycles will happen. Similarly, there are physiological cycles, and both the psychological and the physiological cycles can influence each other, depending on which is the bigger force at that moment.

The knowledge about these cycles has sunk into people in a certain way, and they kind of psych themselves into believing that anyway misery will strike them – and it will. If you understand that you alone make up both joy and misery, there will be no problem. The biggest mistake that people make is they try to be happy. And not only happy – they try to be happier than someone else. That is a serious problem. Do not try to be happy. Once you experientially know that whatever happens within you is caused by you and nothing else but you, you will be blissful. You will neither be flying high nor will you be in the dumps – you will just be blissful. This maintainable height of pleasantness may be different from person to person, depending upon the intensity and the amount of energy that you have, but it is a stable platform. If you want to enjoy an ecstatic state, you can always go up and come back. If you like melancholy, you can go down and come back up again

Source:- Isha Yoga Blog by Sadhguru Ji :)